5 things to know before visiting Oman

Who I am
Aina Prat Blasi
@ainapratblasi
SOURCES CONSULTED:

wikipedia.org, lonelyplanet.com

Author and references

Traveling in Oman means leaving prepared, knowing the currency, the climate and the time zone. Five basic tips that will get you off to a great start on a low cost trip to Oman.

Before seeing theOman I knew almost nothing about this country. I knew where it is yes, I thought it was a rich country because of oil, they told me that it is a clean country and that crime here is very low. I did not know many other things that I discovered instead during the trip to Oman.




I googled the local currency, the climate and a few other things, then I thought that Oman should have conquered me for the landscapes and the people and not for what I was looking for online, also because there is very little online. There are not many bloggers who ended up in Oman, although I found some, and there are few practical information that I have read, that's why I decided to do this post.



Oman is a land that attracts a lot, she is rich, she is beautiful, it has beautiful white beaches, soft sand dunes, Omani men with deep and mysterious eyes and children who greet you while playing in front of the house. The school uniforms are white and blue, the women who live outside the big cities still dress in brightly colored clothes and are beautiful, they accompany each other, go out with their friends and they smell good.

1. Visa at the airport

I arrived at about 3 in the morning and I remember that I was asleep, I had one eye open and one closed and it was really hard to understand where my suitcase was, let alone understand how and where to get a visa. Everyone told me that the visa is 10 euros - the visa in this case can also be paid in euros, so don't worry - but once I got there they charged me 15 with a the rest from the really unfavorable exchange rate. My reaction was not ready and I did not understand if I was wrong to find information or them with the change / change. My traveling companions also had the same impression. Let's say that the arrival was a bit like this and so, but we recovered immediately and well. The advice is to be a little careful though, not to do like me.

2. Cover your legs and don't wear necklines

In Oman you have to cover up. Women usually wear a long dress up to the ankles and the sleeves reach the wrists, have the head and hair covered and often also the veil in front of the face. You certainly don't have to have this type of clothing, but you have to pay attention mainly to two things: legs covered and non-existent necklines. In order not to hurt local women, who are generally the ones who are most affected by the presence of Western women visiting Oman, you should not bring pants above the knee and prefer skirts that possibly reach the ankle. The necklines would be better to avoid them. Not that you have to wear shirts buttoned up to the chin, but try to wear non-provocative shirts or alternatively always wear a nice scarf around the neck and flip it a couple of times.



3. Don't photograph women or even children

Women in Oman do not want to be photographed, or rather, they can be photographed but believe me when I tell you that it is always better to ask before pointing a camera at someone's face. I'm not speaking to say, but because women care a lot about this aspect and believe that the photo can steal their soul. Women who feel violated from this point of view can become dangerous - yes, you got it right - and if you are within stone's reach you better start running fast, also because at that point, if they get really angry and start running fast. shout, men would also intervene. Same thing for children, always, always, always ask if you can photograph them, don't steal the shot, please. You will also find the girl posing if only you are polite enough to ask.


4. Respect the local culture

Our driver in Oman he always ate strictly with his hands. For fear that we would suspiciously see this habit of his or do not understand it, he had asked our guide if he should eat with forks too or he could continue with his hands. The Omanis are very kind, to make you feel at ease and help you, they would do anything, I've seen and tried this on my skin. Respecting their culture means letting people eat as they think and do the same if you feel like it, don't wear clothes that are different from their typical clothing, especially if you are a woman and never photograph women without asking permission. Respecting culture also means understand the lifestyle, religion, habits and customs.


5. Snakes and scorpions

On my trip to Oman I saw only one scorpion, which was dead. There are seven types of deadly snakes in this country and it's very easy, so I'm told, to meet them in the desert. How are they found - and then how can you not find them? Snakes and scorpions feel the vibrations of your steps, so rest assured. In the desert above all, do not walk barefoot in the dunes alone, if you are in a nice group and you want to feel the sand (which I also recommend you do) do it for a limited time, then put your shoes or flip flops back on . Prefer the closed shoes and never take a large stone or pebble, lifting it you will find nasty surprises. #NomadsModerns

Did I scare you a little? Don't worry, you can always read the 5 reasons that surprised me in Oman in the next post.

Audio Video 5 things to know before visiting Oman
add a comment of 5 things to know before visiting Oman
Comment sent successfully! We will review it in the next few hours.